Astronomy Calendar 2023: All Space Events in 2023

Astronomy calendar 2023

The year 2023 has prepared lots of significant astronomical events for us, including solar eclipses, meteor showers, a bright comet passing the Earth, and many more. With this complete astronomy calendar, you’ll never miss one!

Contents

How to see what's in the sky tonight?

In the article, we’ve listed all the notable astronomical events by date. You can bookmark it and check it whenever you go stargazing. The even more complete calendar is accessible in the Sky Tonight app. The app shows you the celestial events that are visible for your location, with detailed information and observing conditions. You can set a reminder for a particular event so that you don’t miss it.

The best astronomical events in 2023

This list contains the observable astronomical events in 2023, with the timings, locations, and observing conditions. You’ll learn when to see planets next to the Moon, or close to each other; the Full Moon and New Moon phases, the best nights with shooting stars, the unique solar eclipses, and more. Don’t have time to read a huge article? Don’t worry, we got you! Here are Top 10 celestial events in 2023 — check it out in the cool infographic format (available in 12 languages).

What are the not-to-miss astronomical events of 2023? Check this calendar to learn when and where to observe the most spectacular celestial shows of the year!
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Astronomical events in January 2023: meteors, conjunctions, lunar occultation

January 4: Quadrantid meteor shower peak 🌟

The Quadrantid meteor shower will run from December 12 to January 12 and peak around January 4. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Bootes. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 110 meteors an hour, though this year, the meteor shower peaks near the Full Moon, whose light will obstruct the view. So, better to observe the meteor shower after moonset until sunrise. The meteor shower will be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere. Check if you are ready to watch shooting stars by taking our quiz!

Take this quiz to see how well you're prepared for meteor hunting and get useful tips on how to catch the most shooting stars.
Take the quiz!

January 6: Full Moon

The Full Wolf Moon will occur on January 6, at 23:08 GMT (6:08 p.m. EST). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Gemini. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

January 21: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on January 21, at 20:53 GMT (03:53 p.m. EST). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

January 22: Venus-Saturn Conjunction

On January 22, at 21:53 GMT (04:53 p.m. EST), Venus (magnitude -3.9) will pass 0°21' to the south of Saturn (magnitude 0.7). They will meet in the constellation Capricornus. The planets will fit together in the field of view of a telescope, but you can also see them with a pair of binoculars or even with the naked eye.

January 23: Moon-Saturn & Moon-Venus conjunctions

On January 23, at 07:22 GMT (02:22 a.m. EST), Saturn (magnitude 0.7) will meet the 2-day-old Moon in the constellation Capricornus. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 3°49'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

Later this day, at 08:20 GMT (03:20 a.m. EST), the Moon will pass near Venus (magnitude -3.9). The distance between the two bodies will be 3°27', which is too far to fit within the field of view of a telescope. Luckily, they will be bright enough to spot without any optical devices.

January 31: Lunar occultation of Mars

On January 31, at 04:27 GMT (on January 30, at 11:27 p.m. EST), Mars (magnitude -0.3) will disappear behind the Moon (magnitude -12.3) in the constellation Taurus. The lunar occultation will be visible from parts of the Americas. The objects will be well-seen by the naked eye, but you may take a telescope or a pair of binoculars for an even better view. Don’t forget to check with the Sky Tonight app if the lunar occultation is visible for your location.

Astronomical events in February 2023: bright comet, conjunctions, occultation

February 1: Comet C/2022 E3 (ZTF) reaches its brightest 🌟

The bright comet C/2022 E3 is heading toward the inner Solar System. On February 1, it will reach maximum brightness, passing the Earth at a distance of 0.28 AU in the constellation Camelopardalis. According to the different estimations, the comet may reach a magnitude between 5.1 to 7.35. It will be well-seen through a pair of binoculars, or maybe even with the naked eye.

February 5: Full Moon

The Full Snow Moon will occur on February 5, at 18:29 GMT (01:29 p.m. EST). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Cancer. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

February 15: Venus-Neptune conjunction

On February 15, at 12:19 GMT (07:19 a.m. EST), Venus (magnitude -4.0) will pass 45” to the south of Neptune (magnitude 8.0). They will meet in the constellation Aquarius. The planets will fit together in the field of view of a telescope, but you can also see them with a pair of binoculars.

February 20: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on February 20, at 07:06 GMT (02:06 a.m. EST). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

February 22: Moon-Venus conjunction

On February 22, at 07:57 GMT (02:57 a.m. EST), Venus (magnitude -4.0) will meet the 2-day-old Moon in the constellation Pisces. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 2°05'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

February 22: Lunar occultation of Jupiter

On February 22, at 22:57 GMT (05:57 p.m. EST), Jupiter (magnitude -2.1) will disappear behind the Moon (magnitude -10.3) in the constellation Pisces. The lunar occultation will be visible from parts of South America and Antarctica. The objects will be well-seen by the naked eye, but you may take a telescope or a pair of binoculars for an even better view. Don’t forget to check with the Sky Tonight app if the lunar occultation is visible for your location.

Astronomical events in March 2023: equinox, planetary conjunctions, lunar occultation

March 2: Venus-Jupiter conjunction

On March 2, at 04:15 GMT (on March 1, at 11:15 p.m. EST), Venus (magnitude -4.0) will pass 0°32' to the north of Jupiter (magnitude -2.1). They will meet in the constellation Pisces. The planets will barely fit together in a telescope's field of view, but you can also see them with a pair of binoculars or even with the naked eye.

March 7: Full Moon

The Full Worm Moon will occur on March 7, at 12:40 GMT (07:40 a.m. EST). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Leo. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

March 20: March equinox 🌟

The March equinox marks the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall in the Southern Hemisphere. In 2023, the equinox occurs on March 20, at 21:25 GMT (05:25 p.m. EDT). We prepared a fun and educational quiz about equinoxes and solstices for you. Check if you can tell the difference between these two astronomical events!

Take our quiz to check your knowledge and learn more about these two astronomical events.
Take the quiz!

March 21: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on March 21, at 17:23 GMT (01:23 p.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

March 24: Lunar occultation of Venus

On March 24, at 10:32 GMT (06:32 a.m. EDT), Venus (magnitude -4.0) will disappear behind the Moon (magnitude -10.1) in the constellation Aries. The lunar occultation will be visible from parts of Africa and Asia. The objects will be well-seen by the naked eye, but you may take a telescope or a pair of binoculars for an even better view. Don’t forget to check with the Sky Tonight app if the lunar occultation is visible for your location.

March 28: Moon-Mars conjunction

On March 28, at 13:16 GMT (09:16 a.m. EDT), Mars (magnitude 0.9) will meet the 7-day-old Moon in the constellation Gemini. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 2°17'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

Astronomical events in April 2023: hybrid solar eclipse, meteors, conjunctions

April 6: Full Moon

The Full Pink Moon will occur on April 6, at 04:34 GMT (12:34 a.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Virgo. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

April 16: Moon-Saturn conjunction

On April 16, at 03:47 GMT (April 15, at 11:47 p.m. EDT), Saturn (magnitude 0.8) will meet the 26-day-old Moon in the constellation Aquarius. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 3°29'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

April 20: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on April 20, at 04:12 GMT (12:12 a.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

April 20: Hybrid solar eclipse 🌟

The hybrid total/annular solar eclipse will occur on April 20, from 01:36 to 06:59 GMT (from April 20 at 09:36 p.m. EDT to April 21 at 02:59 a.m. EDT). It will be visible from East Timor, Indonesia, and Australia. In most cases, a hybrid eclipse begins as annular, becomes total, and then reverts to annular as the Moon's shadow moves across the Earth's surface. It is a very rare celestial event: this century, we’ll only see 7 solar eclipses of that type! Test your knowledge of solar and lunar eclipses with our quiz. Be careful — it’s more difficult than you think!

Can solar eclipses be seen from the Moon? When was a solar eclipse first recorded on video? Test your knowledge of solar and lunar eclipses with this quiz.
Take the Quiz!
List of 5 upcoming lunar and solar eclipses, their dates, timelines, and visibility maps. Find out whether you can see them from your location!
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April 21: Moon-Mercury conjunction

On April 21, at 07:05 GMT (03:05 a.m. EDT), Mercury (magnitude 2.1) will meet the 1-day-old Moon in the constellation Aries. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 1°53'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction through a pair of binoculars.

April 23: Lyrid meteor shower peak

The Lyrid meteor shower will run from April 16 to 25 and peak around April 23. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Hercules from around midnight local time. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 18 meteors an hour. The thin crescent of the 9%-illuminated Moon won’t hinder the view. The meteor shower will be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere; it’ll also be visible in the Southern Hemisphere, but the number of meteors will be lower. Check if you are ready to watch shooting stars by taking our quiz!

Take this quiz to see how well you're prepared for meteor hunting and get useful tips on how to catch the most shooting stars.
Take the quiz!

April 23: Moon-Venus conjunction

On April 23, at 13:03 GMT (09:03 a.m. EDT), Venus (magnitude -4.1) will meet the 3-day-old Moon in the constellation Taurus. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 1°18'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

April 26: Moon-Mars conjunction

On April 26, at 02:18 GMT (10:18 a.m. EDT), Mars (magnitude 1.3) will meet the 6-day-old Moon in the constellation Gemini. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 3°13'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

Astronomical events in May 2023: penumbral lunar eclipse, conjunctions, lunar occultation, Mercury elongation

May 5: Full Moon

The Full Flower Moon will occur on May 5, at 17:34 GMT (01:34 p.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Libra. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

May 5: Penumbral lunar eclipse

On May 5, from 15:15 GMT to 19:32 GMT (from 11:15 a.m. to 03:32 p.m. EDT), the observers from Africa, Oceania, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Greece will experience a penumbral lunar eclipse. This type of eclipse isn’t visible to the naked eye, so this event is only notable for experienced astronomers. Test your knowledge of solar and lunar eclipses with our quiz. Be careful — it’s more difficult than you think!

Can solar eclipses be seen from the Moon? When was a solar eclipse first recorded on video? Test your knowledge of solar and lunar eclipses with this quiz.
Take the Quiz!

May 13: Moon-Saturn conjunction

On May 13, at 13:04 GMT (09:04 a.m. EDT), Saturn (magnitude 0.8) will meet the 23-day-old Moon in the constellation Aquarius. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 3°17'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

May 17: Lunar occultation of Jupiter

On May 17, at 12:40 GMT (08:40 a.m. EDT), Jupiter (magnitude -2.1) will disappear behind the Moon (magnitude -9.4) in the constellation Pisces. The lunar occultation will be visible from parts of the Americas and Europe. The objects will be well-seen by the naked eye, but you may take a telescope or a pair of binoculars for an even better view. Don’t forget to check with the Sky Tonight app if the lunar occultation is visible for your location.

May 19: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on May 19, at 15:53 GMT (11:53 a.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

May 23: Moon-Venus conjunction

On May 23, at 12:08 GMT (08:08 a.m. EDT), Venus (magnitude -4.2) will meet the 4-day-old Moon in the constellation Gemini. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 2°12'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

May 29: Mercury at greatest western elongation

On May 29, at 04:59 GMT (12:59 a.m. EDT), Mercury (magnitude 0.4) will appear at its farthest apparent distance west from the Sun: the celestial bodies will be separated by 24.9°. The event is called the greatest elongation. It’s the best time to observe Mercury, so don’t miss the chance!

Astronomical events in June 2023: solstice, Moon-planetary conjunctions

June 4: Full Moon

The Full Strawberry Moon will occur on June 4, at 03:42 GMT (June 3, 11:42 p.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Scorpius. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

June 14: Moon-Jupiter conjunction

On June 14, at 06:33 GMT (02:33 a.m. EDT), Jupiter (magnitude -2.2) will meet the 26-day-old Moon in the constellation Aries. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 1°30'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

June 16: Moon-Mercury conjunction

On June 16, at 20:40 GMT (04:40 p.m. EDT), Mercury (magnitude -0.8) will meet the 28-day-old Moon in the constellation Taurus. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 4°18'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

June 18: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on June 18, at 04:37 GMT (12:37 a.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

June 21: June solstice 🌟

The June solstice marks the first day of astronomical summer in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter in the Southern Hemisphere. In 2023, it will happen on June 21, at 14:58 GMT (10:58 a.m. EDT). It will be the longest day in the Northern Hemisphere; the observers from the Southern Hemisphere, on the contrary, will experience the least amount of sunlight and the shortest day of the year. We prepared a fun and educational quiz about equinoxes and solstices for you. Check if you can tell the difference between these two astronomical events!

Take our quiz to check your knowledge and learn more about these two astronomical events.
Take the quiz!

June 22: Moon-Venus conjunction

On June 22, at 00:47 GMT (June 21, 08:47 p.m. EDT), Venus (magnitude -4.4) will meet the 4-day-old Moon in the constellation Cancer. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 3°41'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

Astronomical events in July 2023: Supermoon, meteors, conjunctions

July 3: Super Full Moon

The Super Buck Moon will occur on July 3, at 11:39 GMT (07:39 a.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Sagittarius. The prefix “Super” means that the Full Moon will closely coincide with our natural satellite’s closest approach to the Earth (perigee). A Supermoon looks bigger and brighter than a usual one.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

July 11: Moon-Jupiter conjunction

On July 11, at 21:18 GMT (05:18 p.m. EDT), Jupiter (magnitude -2.3) will meet the 23-day-old Moon in the constellation Aries. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 2°13'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

July 17: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on July 17, at 18:32 GMT (02:32 p.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

July 20: Moon-Venus conjunction

On July 20, at 08:38 GMT (04:38 a.m. EDT), Venus (magnitude -4.4) will meet the 3-day-old Moon in the constellation Leo. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 7°51'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll easily see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

July 27: Venus-Mercury conjunction

On July 27, at 11:00 GMT (07:00 a.m. EDT), Venus (magnitude -4.3) will pass 5°17' to the south of Mercury (magnitude -0.1). They will meet in the constellation Leo. The planets won’t fit together in the field of view of a telescope, but you can see them with a pair of binoculars or even with the naked eye.

July 30: Southern Delta Aquariid meteor shower peak

The Southern Delta Aquariid meteor shower will run from July 12 to August 23 and peak around July 30. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Aquarius. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 25 meteors an hour, though this year, the meteor shower occurs near the 89%-illuminated Moon, whose light will obstruct the view. So, better to observe the Southern Delta Aquariids after the moonset until sunrise. The meteor shower is better seen from the Southern Hemisphere, though it’s also visible from the southern latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere. Check if you are ready to watch shooting stars by taking our quiz!

Take this quiz to see how well you're prepared for meteor hunting and get useful tips on how to catch the most shooting stars.
Take the quiz!

Astronomical events in August 2023: Supermoon, meteors, Saturn at opposition, Super Blue Moon

August 1: Super Full Moon

The Super Sturgeon Moon will occur on August 1, at 18:31 GMT (02:31 p.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Capricornus. The prefix “Super” means that the Full Moon will closely coincide with our natural satellite’s closest approach to the Earth (perigee). A Supermoon looks bigger and brighter than a usual Full Moon.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

August 13: Perseid meteor shower peak 🌟

The Perseid meteor shower will run from July 17 to August 24 and peak around August 13. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Perseus from around midnight local time. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 100 meteors an hour. The 10%-illuminated Moon will be in the waning crescent phase and won’t obstruct the view. The meteor shower will be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere. Check if you are ready to watch shooting stars by taking our quiz!

Take this quiz to see how well you're prepared for meteor hunting and get useful tips on how to catch the most shooting stars.
Take the quiz!

August 16: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on August 16, at 09:38 GMT (05:38 a.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

August 27: Saturn at opposition 🌟

On August 27, at 14:52 GMT (10:52 a.m. EDT), Saturn will reach opposition to the Sun and shine at its brightest with a magnitude of 0.4. The ringed planet will be located in the constellation Aquarius, looking like a yellowish dot to the naked eye. You’ll see Saturn’s oval shape with a pair of binoculars, but you’ll need at least a small 4-inch telescope to see its rings.

August 30: Moon-Saturn conjunction

On August 30, at 18:03 GMT (02:03 p.m. EDT), Saturn (magnitude 0.4) will meet the 14-day-old Moon in the constellation Aquarius. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 2°29'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll easily see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

August 31: Super Blue Full Moon 🌟

The Super Blue Moon will occur on August 31, at 01:35 GMT (August 30, at 09:35 p.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Aquarius. The name “Blue Moon” is used for a second Full Moon happening in a calendar month. Will our natural satellite really turn blue? Check it with our fun quiz about the Moon’s colors.

When can you see a Blood Moon? Why does the Moon sometimes look white and sometimes orange? Learn more about our natural satellite with this quiz!
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When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
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Moreover, it will be the biggest Supermoon of the year 2023! Learn what’s the difference between a Supermoon and an ordinary Full Moon from our theme-based article.

Astronomical events in September 2023: equinox, conjunctions, Supermoon, Neptune at opposition

September 4: Moon-Jupiter conjunction

On September 4, at 19:44 GMT (03:44 p.m. EDT), Jupiter (magnitude -2.7) will meet the 19-day-old Moon in the constellation Aries. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 3°18'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll easily see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

September 15: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on September 15, at 01:40 GMT (September 14, at 09:40 p.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

September 19: Neptune at opposition

On September 19, at 16:54 GMT (12:54 p.m. EDT), Neptune will reach opposition. The planet will shine with a magnitude of 7.8 in the constellation Pisces. It will rise right after sunset in the direction opposite the Sun, reach its highest point around midnight local time, and stay in the sky till dawn. Even in its brightest state, Neptune will be difficult to distinguish in the night sky, so take a telescope to enjoy the view of the planet.

September 23: September equinox 🌟

The September equinox marks the beginning of fall in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring in the Southern Hemisphere. In 2023, the equinox will occur on September 23, at 06:50 GMT (02:50 a.m. EDT). We prepared a fun and educational quiz about equinoxes and solstices for you. Check if you can tell the difference between these two astronomical events!

Take our quiz to check your knowledge and learn more about these two astronomical events.
Take the quiz!

September 27: Moon-Saturn conjunction

On September 27, at 01:25 GMT (September 26, at 09:25 p.m. EDT), Saturn (magnitude 0.4) will meet the 12-day-old Moon in the constellation Aquarius. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 2°38'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll easily see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

September 29: Super Full Moon

The Super Harvest Moon will occur on September 29, at 09:57 GMT (05:57 a.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Pisces. The prefix “Super” means that the Full Moon will closely coincide with our natural satellite’s closest approach to the Earth (perigee). A Supermoon looks bigger and brighter than a usual one.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

Astronomical events in October 2023: annular solar eclipse, meteors, conjunctions, partial lunar eclipse, New Moon

October 2: Moon-Jupiter conjunction

On October 2, at 03:16 GMT (October 1, 11:16 p.m. EDT), Jupiter (magnitude -2.8) will meet the 17-day-old Moon in the constellation Aries. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 3°23'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll easily see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

October 9: Draconid meteor shower peak

The Draconid meteor shower will run from October 6 to 10 and peak around October 9. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Draco soon after dusk. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 10 meteors an hour. The 25%-illuminated waning crescent Moon won’t obstruct the view. The meteor shower will be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere.

October 14: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on October 14, at 17:55 GMT (01:55 p.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

October 14: Annular solar eclipse 🌟

On October 14, from 15:05 to 20:55 GMT (from 11:05 a.m. to 04:55 p.m. EDT), observers from the United States, Mexico, Belize, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Colombia, and Brazil will see the annular solar eclipse. The Moon will cover the Sun's center, and the observers will see “the ring of fire” around it. Test your knowledge of solar and lunar eclipses with our quiz. Be careful — it’s more difficult than you think!

Can solar eclipses be seen from the Moon? When was a solar eclipse first recorded on video? Test your knowledge of solar and lunar eclipses with this quiz.
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October 22: Orionid meteor shower peak

The Orionid meteor shower will run from October 2 to November 7 and peak around October 22. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Orion from around midnight local time. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 20 meteors an hour. The 49%-illuminated Moon will set soon after midnight, so it won’t hinder the view. The meteor shower will be well-seen from both hemispheres. Check if you are ready to watch shooting stars by taking our quiz!

Take this quiz to see how well you're prepared for meteor hunting and get useful tips on how to catch the most shooting stars.
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October 24: Moon-Saturn conjunction

On October 24, at 07:52 GMT (03:52 p.m. EDT), Saturn (magnitude 0.5) will meet the 10-day-old Moon in the constellation Aquarius. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 2°46'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

October 28: Full Moon

The Full Hunter’s Moon will occur on October 28, at 20:24 GMT (04:24 p.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Libra. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
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October 28: Partial lunar eclipse

On October 28, from 19:36 to 20:53 GMT (from 03:36 p.m. to 04:53 p.m. EDT), stargazers will see a partial lunar eclipse. During this eclipse, the part of the lunar disk looks darkened because it’s covered by the Earth’s umbral shadow. The eclipse will be visible everywhere on the night side of the Earth, including Africa, Oceania, North and South America, Asia, and Europe. The maximum phase of the eclipse will occur at 20:15 GMT. At that point, 12% of the lunar disk will lie in shadow.

List of 5 upcoming lunar and solar eclipses, their dates, timelines, and visibility maps. Find out whether you can see them from your location!
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Astronomical events in November 2023: planetary oppositions, meteors, lunar occultation

November 3: Jupiter at opposition 🌟

On November 3, at 10:44 GMT (06:44 a.m. EDT), Jupiter will reach opposition. Look for the blazing dot in the constellation Aries. It will shine with a magnitude of -2.9, making it the brightest starlike object after “the morning star” Venus.

November 9: Lunar occultation of Venus

On November 9, at 10:34 GMT (05:34 a.m. EST), Venus (magnitude -4.3) will disappear behind the 15% illuminated Moon (magnitude -10.5) in the constellation Virgo. The lunar occultation will be visible from parts of Africa, Europe, and Greenland. Take a telescope or a pair of binoculars to observe the objects or spot them with the naked eye, and don’t forget to check with the Sky Tonight app if the lunar occultation is visible for your location.

November 13: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on November 13, at 09:27 GMT (04:27 a.m. EST). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

November 14: Uranus at opposition

On November 14, at 00:32 GMT (November 13, at 07:32 p.m. EST), Uranus will reach opposition. The planet will shine with a magnitude of 5.6 in the constellation Aries. Even at its biggest and brightest, Uranus will still be tricky to spot, so it’s better to search for it with at least a small telescope. The planet will be in the best position to observe at around midnight local time.

November 18: Leonid meteor shower peak

The Leonid meteor shower will run from November 6 to 30 and peak around November 18. Start looking for its radiant point in the constellation Leo shortly before midnight local time. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 10 meteors an hour. The 25%-illuminated waxing crescent Moon won’t obstruct the view. The meteor shower will be well-seen from both hemispheres. Check if you are ready to watch shooting stars by taking our quiz!

Take this quiz to see how well you're prepared for meteor hunting and get useful tips on how to catch the most shooting stars.
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November 27: Full Moon

The Full Beaver Moon will occur on November 27, at 09:16 GMT (04:16 a.m. EST). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Taurus. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
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Astronomical events in December 2023: meteors, solstice, conjunction

December 12: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on December 12, at 23:32 GMT (06:32 p.m. EST). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

December 14: Geminid meteor shower peak 🌟

The Geminid meteor shower will run from December 4 to 17 and peak around December 14. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Gemini from around 22:00 local time. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 150 meteors an hour. The Geminids will peak soon after the New Moon, so it won’t obstruct the view. The meteor shower will be well-seen from both hemispheres. Check if you are ready to watch shooting stars by taking our quiz!

Take this quiz to see how well you're prepared for meteor hunting and get useful tips on how to catch the most shooting stars.
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December 22: December solstice 🌟

The December solstice marks the first day of astronomical winter in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer in the Southern Hemisphere. In 2023, it will happen on December 22, at 03:28 GMT (December 21, at 10:28 p.m. EST). It will be the shortest day in the Northern Hemisphere; the Southern Hemisphere, on the contrary, will experience the greatest amount of sunlight and the longest day of the year. We prepared a fun and educational quiz about equinoxes and solstices for you. Check if you can tell the difference between these two astronomical events!

Take our quiz to check your knowledge and learn more about these two astronomical events.
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December 22: Moon-Jupiter conjunction

On December 22, at 14:20 GMT (09:20 a.m. EST), Jupiter (magnitude -2.7) will meet the 10-day-old Moon in the constellation Aries. The apparent distance between the two objects will be 2°36'. It’s too far to spot them at once via telescope, but you’ll easily see the conjunction with the naked eye or binoculars.

December 23: Ursid meteor shower peak

The Ursid meteor shower will run from December 17 to 26 and peak around December 23. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Ursa Minor. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 10 meteors an hour. However, this year, the meteor shower peaks 3 days before the Full Moon, so the 84%-illuminated lunar disk will obstruct the view. Start observing the meteor shower after moonset until sunrise. The Ursids will be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere.

December 27: Full Moon

The Full Cold Moon will occur on December 27, at 00:33 GMT (December 26, at 07:33 p.m. EST). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Auriga. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
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Bottom line: Now you know all the major celestial events in 2023. The best of these events are listed in our separate article about the top 10 celestial events in 2023. Get an even more complete calendar in the Sky Tonight app, and follow us on social media to keep up with the latest astronomy news.

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