Full Moons Calendar 2023: The Year Of 13 Full Moons

~8 min
Topics:Moon
Full Moons 2023 — White Moon

2023 is an exceptional year with 13 Full Moons, four (or two, depending on what source to rely on) Supermoons and one Blue Moon. Track all of them with this calendar and learn their names and meanings.

Contents

Unfortunately, 2023 is missing a Blood Moon — a Full Moon that coincides with a total lunar eclipse, turning red. The reason is that there will be no total lunar eclipse this year. Find out what eclipses are coming next from our infographic.

List of 5 upcoming lunar and solar eclipses, their dates, timelines, and visibility maps. Find out whether you can see them from your location!
See Infographic

Full Moon 2023 Calendar#

Here are the dates and times for each Full Moon this year.

  • January 6, 23:08 GMT (6:08 p.m. EST): Wolf Moon
  • February 5, 18:29 GMT (1:29 p.m. EST): Snow Moon
  • March 7, 12:40 GMT (7:40 a.m. EST): Worm Moon
  • April 6, 04:34 GMT (12:34 a.m. EDT): Pink Moon
  • May 5, 17:34 GMT (1:34 p.m. EDT): Flower Moon
  • June 4, 03:42 GMT (June 3, 11:42 p.m. EDT): Strawberry Moon
  • July 3, 11:39 GMT (7:39 a.m. EDT): Super Buck Moon
  • August 1, 18:31 GMT (2:31 p.m. EDT): Super Sturgeon Moon
  • August 31, 01:35 GMT (August 30, 9:35 p.m. EDT): Super Blue Moon (the biggest Full Moon in 2023)
  • September 29, 09:57 GMT (5:57 a.m. EDT): Super Harvest Moon
  • October 28, 20:24 GMT (4:24 p.m. EDT): Hunter’s Moon
  • November 27, 09:16 GMT (4:16 a.m. EST): Beaver Moon
  • December 27, 03:33 GMT (December 26, 10:33 p.m. EST): Cold Moon

For a visual representation, check out our Full Moons 2023 infographic. Don’t forget to share it with your friends if you like it!

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic

Full Moon 2023 names and their meanings#

Most of the Full Moon names commonly known today come from Native American, colonial American, and European cultures. There are also alternative names for each Full Moon that have not become popular in modern folklore but are used in other cultures.

Let's find out what each Full Moon this year is called and what it means.

January Full Moon: Wolf Moon (January 6)#

Throughout cold January nights, the howling of wolves could be heard around villages in both Europe and America, so the January Full Moon became widely known as the Wolf Moon.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Holiday Moon
  • Celtic: Quiet Moon
  • Cherokee: Cold Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Hay Moon, Buck Moon, Thunder Moon, Mead Moon

February Full Moon: Snow Moon (February 5)#

As February is the month of heaviest snowfalls in North America, the February Full Moon was called the Snow Moon.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Budding Moon
  • Celtic: Ice Moon
  • Cherokee: Bony Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Grain Moon, Barley Moon, Red Moon, Dog Moon

March Full Moon: Worm Moon (March 7)#

The Full Moon in March is called the Worm Moon because this month, the earthworms start to appear in the soil, that finally warms up after the cold winter season.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Sleepy Moon
  • Celtic: Moon of Winds
  • Cherokee: Windy Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Harvest Moon, Corn Moon

April Full Moon: Pink Moon (April 6)#

April Full Moon was named the Pink Moon to represent the color of the wild ground phlox — one of the earliest flowers to bloom this month.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Peony Moon
  • Celtic: Growing Moon
  • Cherokee: Flower Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Harvest Moon, Hunter’s Moon

May Full Moon: Flower Moon (May 5)#

May is the season for many flowers to bloom, which is why the Native Americans, admiring the beauty of the blooming nature, named the Full Moon this way.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Dragon Moon
  • Celtic: Bright Moon
  • Cherokee: Planting Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Beaver Moon, Frost Moon

June Full Moon: Strawberry Moon (June 4)#

June was the strawberry harvesting season for Native American tribes, and they gave the June Full Moon the correlating name.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Lotus Moon
  • Celtic: Moon of Horses
  • Cherokee: Green Corn Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Oak Moon, Cold Moon, Long Night’s Moon

July Full Moon: Super Buck Moon (July 3)#

The Full Moon in July is known as the Buck Moon as young male deer (also known as bucks) grow new antlers this month. The prefix “Super” means that this Full Moon closely coincides with our natural satellite’s closest approach to the Earth (perigee). Such a Full Moon looks bigger and brighter than a usual one.

By the way, the Buck Moon 2023 is considered “super” only in astronomical sources, but it didn’t make it into the list of Supermoons from Richard Nolle, the astrologer who coined this term.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Hungry Ghost Moon
  • Celtic: Moon of Claiming
  • Cherokee: Ripe Corn Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Wolf Moon, Old Moon, Ice Moon

August Full Moon: Super Sturgeon Moon (August 1)#

For many tribes living around the Great Lakes, August was traditionally the time to fish for sturgeon, hence the name for the August Full Moon. In 2023, Sturgeon Moon will be a Super Full Moon, meaning it will look slightly larger and brighter than a usual one. It’s listed as “Super” in astronomical and astrological tables.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Harvest Moon
  • Celtic: Dispute Moon
  • Cherokee: Fruit Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Snow Moon, Storm Moon, Hunger Moon, Wolf Moon

August Full Moon: Super Blue Moon (August 31)#

The second Full Moon in one calendar month is called the Blue Moon. The word "Super" means that this Full Moon occurs near perigee and looks bigger and brighter to observers. Moreover, the Super Blue Moon will come closer to the Earth than any other Full Moon in 2023, so it will be the biggest Full Moon of the year! According to Richard Nolle, the astrologer who came up with the term "Supermoon", this is also the last Supermoon of 2023.

Unlike the other Full Moon names, a Blue Moon doesn’t have a folklore background and came into common use recently, so there are no alternative names for it from different cultures. At most, it’s called an “extra” Full Moon. Although some sources claim that Catholic clergy called it a Betrayer (Belewe) Moon, there is no clear evidence for this.

September Full Moon: Super Harvest Moon (September 29)#

The Harvest Moon is the Full Moon closest to the autumnal equinox, which will take place on September 23 in the Northern Hemisphere this year.

Around the equinox, the Moon rises soon after sunset. In the past, this gave farmers extra time for harvesting in the evening, under the moonlight. That’s why the Full Moon occurring around the autumnal equinox was called the Harvest Moon.

Astronomically speaking, Harvest Moon 2023 is the last Supermoon of the year. However, the author of the term Richard Nolle did not include it in his list of Supermoons.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Chrysanthemum Moon
  • Celtic: Singing Moon
  • Cherokee: Nut Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Worm Moon, Lenten Moon, Crow Moon, Sugar Moon, Chaste Moon

October Full Moon: Hunter’s Moon (October 28)#

The Hunter’s Moon is the Full Moon which comes right after the Harvest Moon. This means it may take place in October or November (in the Southern Hemisphere – in April or May).

All the harvesting work was usually done under the Harvest Moon, and by the time of the next Full Moon, the fields were clean. So the hunters could easily see the animals roaming in search of food before the winter. This is why the Full Moon after the Harvest Moon is called the Hunter’s Moon.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Kindly Moon
  • Wiccan: Blood Moon
  • South African: Seed Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Egg Moon, Fish Moon, Pink Moon, Waking Moon

November Full Moon: Beaver Moon (November 27)#

In November, hunters usually trapped beavers to collect their thick fur ahead of the chilly season. This is also a time when beavers begin to hide in their lodges, having saved enough food for the winter.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: White Moon
  • Cree: Frost Moon
  • Celtic: Dark Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Corn Moon, Milk Moon, Hare Moon

December Full Moon: Cold Moon (December 27)#

The name “Cold Moon” denotes the harsh weather conditions of the month when the temperature drops significantly.

Alternative Names:

  • Chinese: Bitter Moon
  • English Medieval: Oak Moon
  • Cherokee: Snow Moon
  • Southern Hemisphere: Strawberry Moon, Honey Moon, Rose Moon

How many Full Moons are there in 2023?#

In 2023, there will be 13 Full Moons. One “extra” Moon will take place in August. But don’t be surprised — 13 Full Moons a year is not such a rare event. The next time after 2023, 13 Full Moons a year will take place in 2026.

On average, a Full Moon occurs every 29.53 days, and it takes 354 days to complete 12 cycles. Obviously, this is shorter than one calendar year, which is 365 (or 366) days. So roughly every 2.5 years, there is the 13th Full Moon.

Track all the Moon phases with the help of the Sky Tonight app. The app has a whole section dedicated to our natural satellite — it shows the Moon’s illumination, phase, set and rise times for every day of the chosen month and the Moon's size according to the apparent size of the “real” Moon in the sky.

F.A.Q.#

When is the Full Moon in January 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on January 6, 2023, at 23:08 GMT (6:08 p.m. EST).

When is the Full Moon in February 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on February 5, 2023, at 18:29 GMT (1:29 p.m. EST).

When is the Full Moon in March 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on March 7, 2023, at 12:40 GMT (7:40 a.m. EST).

When is the Full Moon in April 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on April 6, 2023, at 04:34 GMT (12:34 a.m. EDT).

When is the Full Moon in May 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on May 5, 2023, at 17:34 GMT (1:34 p.m. EDT). The same day, at 17:22 GMT (1:22 p.m. EDT), the penumbral lunar eclipse will reach its maximum phase.

When is the Full Moon in June 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on June 4, 2023, at 03:42 GMT (June 3, 11:42 p.m. EDT).

When is the Full Moon in July 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on July 3, 2023, at 11:39 GMT (7:39 a.m. EDT). It will be a Supermoon, which means that it will appear slightly bigger and brighter than a usual Full Moon.

When is the Full Moon in August 2023?#

There will be two Full Moons in one calendar month; one will take place on August 1 at 18:31 GMT (2:31 p.m. EDT) and the second one — on August 31 at 01:35 GMT (August 30, 9:35 p.m. EDT). Both of the August Full Moons will also be Supermoons, which means that they will appear slightly bigger and brighter than a usual Full Moon.

When is the Full Moon in September 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on September 29, 2023, at 09:57 GMT (5:57 a.m. EDT). It will be a Supermoon, which means that it will appear slightly bigger and brighter than a usual Full Moon.

When is the Full Moon in October 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on October 28, 2023, at 20:24 GMT (4:24 p.m. EDT). The same day, at 20:14 GMT (4;14 p.m. EDT), a partial lunar eclipse will reach its maximum phase.

When is the Full Moon in November 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on November 27, 2023, at 09:16 GMT (4:16 a.m. EST).

When is the Full Moon in December 2023?#

The Full Moon will occur on December 27, 2023, at 03:33 GMT (December 26, 10:33 p.m. EST).

Bottom line: In 2023, we will see four Supermoons, one Blue Moon, and 13 Full Moons in total. Don’t miss the second Full Moon of August, as it will also be the largest Full Moon of the year. Track all Full Moons of the year using our infographic.

When is the next Full Moon in 2023? When is the Super Blue Moon this year? Check our Full Moon calendar for all dates, times, names, Supermoons, and more for the year.
See Infographic
Topics:Moon
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