All Astronomical Events 2024: Detailed Stargazing Calendar

Get ready to observe the sky in 2024! Our comprehensive list of all the year's astronomical events will ensure you don't miss a single celestial spectacle.

Contents

To stay updated with celestial events, check the astronomical calendars in the Star Walk 2 and Sky Tonight stargazing apps. There, you can find the exact date and time for any event and locate celestial bodies in the sky above you. Also, both apps can send you a notification about an event you want to observe, so you definitely won't miss it!

Astronomical events in January 2024

January 4: Quadrantid meteor shower peak

The Quadrantid meteor shower will run from December 28 to January 12 and peak around January 4. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Bootes. Under ideal conditions, you can see around 80 meteors an hour. This year, the Quadrantids show maximum activity near the Last Quarter Moon. It’s best to observe the meteor shower after sunset until moonrise. The meteor shower will be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere.

January 8: Moon near Venus

  • Close approach time: 18:45 GMT (1:45 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 5°36'
  • Conjunction time: 20:12 GMT (3:12 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 5°42'

On January 8, the 14%-illuminated Moon will be close to Venus (mag -4.3). The Moon will be in the constellation Scorpius, and Venus – in the neighboring constellation Ophiuchus. Observe them with the naked eye.

January 9: Moon near Mercury

  • Conjunction time: 18:49 GMT (1:49 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 6°35'

On January 9, the 7.2%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mercury (mag -0.2). Both objects will be in the constellation Ophiuchus. Observe them with the naked eye.

January 11: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on January 11, at 11:57 GMT (6:57 a.m. EST). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

January 12: Mercury at greatest elongation west

On January 12, at 13:59 GMT (8:59 a.m. EST), Mercury (mag -0.3) will appear at its farthest apparent distance west from the Sun: the celestial bodies will be separated by 23°30'. The event is called the greatest elongation. It’s the best time to observe Mercury, so don’t miss the chance!

January 14: Moon near Saturn

  • Conjunction time: 09:31 GMT (4:31 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 4°09'
  • Close approach time: 10:50 GMT (5:50 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 1°57'

On January 14, the 11.7%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 1.0). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

January 18: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 19:05 GMT (2:05 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 2°32'
  • Conjunction time: 20:40 GMT (3:40 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 2°54'

On January 18, the 54%-illuminated Moon and Jupiter (mag -2.5) will share the same right ascension. Both objects will be in the constellation Aries. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

January 25: Full Moon

The Full Wolf Moon will occur on January 25, at 17:56 GMT (12:56 p.m. EST). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Cancer. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

January 27: Mercury near Mars

  • Close approach time: 14:59 GMT (9:59 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 0°15'
  • Conjunction time: 15:48 GMT (10:48 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°12'

On January 27, Mercury (mag -0.2) will meet Mars (mag 1.3) in the constellation Sagittarius. The pair will be visible to the naked eye, but you can also observe them closely through a telescope or binoculars.

Astronomical events in February 2024

February 7: Moon near Venus

  • Conjunction time: 18:52 GMT (1:52 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 5°22'

On February 7, the 11.2%-illuminated Moon will be close to Venus (mag. -3.9). Both objects will be in the constellation Sagittarius. Observe them with the naked eye.

February 9: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on February 9, at 22:59 GMT (5:59 p.m. EST). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

February 15: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 06:31 GMT (1:31 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 2°55'
  • Conjunction time: 08:15 GMT (3:15 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 3°12'

On February 15, the 37.5%-illuminated Moon will be close to Jupiter (mag -2.3). Both objects will be in the constellation Aries. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

February 22: Venus near Mars

  • Conjunction time: 09:01 GMT (4:01 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°36'
  • Close approach time: 09:46 GMT (4:46 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 0°37'

On February 22, Venus (mag -3.9) will meet Mars (mag 1.3) in the constellation Capricornus. The planets will be clearly visible to the naked eye, but you can also observe them closer with a pair of binoculars.

February 24: Full Moon

The Full Snow Moon will occur on February 24, at 12:30 GMT (7:30 a.m. EST). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Leo. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

Astronomical events in March 2024

March 8: Moon near Mars

  • Conjunction time: 04:59 GMT (March 7, 11:59 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 3°30'
  • Close approach time: 06:51 GMT (1:51 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 3°17'

On March 8, the 7.4%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag 1.2). Both objects will be in the constellation Capricornus. Observe them with the naked eye.

March 8: Moon near Venus

  • Conjunction time: 17:01 GMT (12:01 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 3°12'
  • Close approach time: 18:56 GMT (1:56 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 3°00'

On March 8, the 7.4%-illuminated Moon will be close to Venus (mag. -3.8). Both objects will be in the constellation Capricornus. Observe them with the naked eye.

March 10: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on March 10, at 09:00 GMT (4:00 a.m. EST). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

March 13: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 23:13 GMT (6:13 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 3° 20'
  • Conjunction time: March 14, 01:01 GMT (March 13, 8:01 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 3°36'

On March 13, the 12.8%-illuminated Moon will be close to Jupiter (mag -2.1). Both objects will be in the constellation Aries. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

March 20: March equinox

The March equinox marks the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of fall in the Southern Hemisphere. In 2024, the equinox occurs on March 20, at 03:07 GMT (March 19, 11:07 p.m. EDT). We prepared a fun and educational quiz about equinoxes and solstices for you. Check if you can tell the difference between these two astronomical events!

Equinoxes & solstices quiz intro#2
Only 10% of people can get the top score in this tricky quiz about equinoxes and solstices!🌝🌏 Test your knowledge and try to join the elite few!
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Equinox Infographic Preview
Discover the science behind the equinoxes with this infographic! Learn about the changing of seasons and the balance between day and night.
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March 21: Venus near Saturn

  • Close approach time: 22:06 GMT (6:06 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°18'
  • Conjunction time: March 22, 01:59 GMT (March 21, 9:06 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°20'

On March 21, Venus (mag -3.8) will meet Saturn (mag 1.1) in the constellation Aquarius. The planets will be clearly visible to the naked eye, but you can also observe them closer with a telescope or a pair of binoculars.

March 24: Mercury at greatest elongation east

On March 24, at 17:54 GMT (1:54 p.m. EDT), Mercury (mag -0.4) will appear at its farthest apparent distance east from the Sun: the celestial bodies will be separated by 18°42'. The event is called the greatest elongation. It’s the best time to observe Mercury, so don’t miss the chance!

March 25: Full Moon, penumbral lunar eclipse

The Full Worm Moon will occur on March 25, at 07:00 GMT (3:00 a.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Virgo. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

Also, on the same day, between 04:53 GMT and 09:32 GMT, the Moon will pass through the Earth’s penumbral shadow, creating a penumbral lunar eclipse. The Moon will be 95.6% in this shadow. The penumbral lunar eclipse will be visible from much of Europe, north and east of Asia, much of Australia, much of Africa, North America, South America, the Arctic, and Antarctica.

Astronomical events in April 2024

April 3: Venus near Neptune

  • Close approach time: 13:11 GMT (9:11 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°16'

On April 3, Venus (mag -3.8) will meet Neptune (mag 8.0) in the constellation Pisces. The planets will be clearly visible with a pair of binoculars.

April 6: Moon near Mars

  • Conjunction time: 03:51 GMT (April 5, 11:51 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 2°00'
  • Close approach time: 05:08 GMT (1:08 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 1°46'

On April 6, the 10%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag 1.2). Both objects will be in the constellation Aries. Observe them with the naked eye.

April 6: Moon near Saturn; lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Conjunction time: 09:20 GMT (5:20 a.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 1°12'
  • Close approach time: 10:10 GMT (6:10 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 1°05'

On April 6, the 10%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 1.1). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. If you happen to be in Antarctica, you might also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

April 8: Total solar eclipse

On April 8, from 15:43 GMT to 20:52 GMT, observers from Mexico, the US, and Canada will see the total solar eclipse. The Moon will cover the Sun, and the solar corona will be visible around the lunar disc. Test your knowledge of solar and lunar eclipses with our quiz. Be careful — it’s more difficult than you think!

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April 8: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on April 8, at 18:21 GMT (2:21 p.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

April 10: Saturn near Mars

  • Conjunction time: 18:46 GMT (2:46 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°24'
  • Close approach time: 20:36 GMT (4:36 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°26'

On April 10, Saturn (mag 1.1) will meet Mars (mag 1.2) in the constellation Aquarius. The planets will be clearly visible to the naked eye, but you can also observe them closer with a telescope or a pair of binoculars.

April 21: comet 12P/Pons–Brooks reaches its brightest

On April 21, 2024, comet 12P/Pons-Brooks will reach its perihelion, the closest point to the Sun. By that time, it is expected to become visible to the naked eye (its magnitude will rise to 4.2). Soon after the perihelion, the comet will disappear from the Northern Hemisphere’s night sky. In the Southern Hemisphere, it will remain visible until the end of the year.

April 21: Jupiter near Uranus

  • Close approach time: 02:27 GMT (April 20, 10:27 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°30'

On April 21, Jupiter (mag -2.0) will meet Uranus (mag 5.8) in the constellation Aries. You can observe them with a pair of binoculars.

April 22: Lyrid meteor shower peak

The Lyrid meteor shower will run from April 14 to 30 and peak around April 22. It is one of the most popular and long-awaited meteor showers of the year, known to produce bright fireballs. However, this year, the Lyrids reach their maximum three days before the Full Moon, so the moonlight will likely outshine most meteors.

April 23: Full Moon

The Full Pink Moon will occur on April 23, at 23:49 GMT (7:49 p.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Virgo. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

April 29: Mars near Neptune

  • Close approach time: 04:31 GMT (12:31 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°02'

On April 29, Mars (mag 1.1) will meet Neptune (mag 7.9) in the constellation Pisces. You can observe them with a telescope or a pair of binoculars.

Astronomical events in May 2024

May 3: Moon near Saturn; lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Conjunction time: 22:26 GMT (6:26 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°48'
  • Close approach time: 23:05 GMT (7:05 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°45'

On May 3, the 32.3%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 1.2). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. If you happen to be in Antarctica, you might also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

May 5: Eta Aquariid meteor shower peak

The Eta Aquariid (η-Aquariid) meteor shower will run from April 19 to May 28 and peak around May 5. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Aquarius. On a clear dark night, the Eta Aquariids can produce up to 50 meteors per hour if you watch them from the southern latitudes. North of the equator, you can see 10-30 shooting stars per hour. This year, the Eta Aquariids reach their peak around the New Moon, so observers can enjoy the darkest sky until sunrise.

May 5: Moon near Mars; lunar occultation of Mars

  • Close approach time: 02:17 GMT (May 4, 11:17 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°10' GMT
  • Conjunction time: 02:26 GMT (May 4, 11:26 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°12'

On May 5, the 12.4%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag 1.1). Both objects will be in the constellation Pisces. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from Madagascar, Mauritius, Reunion, and Seychelles will also see a lunar occultation of Mars.

May 6: Moon near Mercury

  • Close approach time: 05:57 GMT (1:57 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 3°24'
  • Conjunction time: 08:25 GMT (4:25 a.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 3°48'

On May 6, the 5.4%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mercury (mag 0.6). Both objects will be in the constellation Pisces. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

May 8: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on May 8, at 03:22 GMT (May 7, 11:22 p.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

May 9: Mercury at greatest elongation west

On May 9, at 20:59 GMT (4:59 p.m. EDT), Mercury (mag 0.4) will appear at its farthest apparent distance west from the Sun: the celestial bodies will be separated by 26°24'. The event is called the greatest elongation. It’s the best time to observe Mercury, so don’t miss the chance!

May 23: Full Moon

The Full Flower Moon will occur on May 23, at 13:53 GMT (9:53 a.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Scorpius. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

May 31: Mercury near Uranus

  • Close approach time: 05:54 GMT (1:54 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 1°17'

On May 31, Mercury (mag -0.8) will meet Uranus (mag 5.8) in the constellation Taurus. You can observe them with a pair of binoculars.

May 31: Moon near Saturn; lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Conjunction time: 08:01 GMT (4:01 a.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°24'
  • Close approach time: 08:24 GMT (4:24 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°20'

On May 31, the 46.7%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 1.2). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from Argentina, Chile, southern Brazil, and Uruguay will also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

Astronomical events in June 2024

June 2: Moon near Mars

  • Close approach time: 22:04 GMT (6:04 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 2°10'
  • Conjunction time: 23:37 GMT (7:37 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 2°24'

On June 2, the 24%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag 1.1). Both objects will be in the constellation Pisces. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

June 4: Jupiter near Mercury

  • Close approach time: 10:23 GMT (6:23 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°07'

On June 4, Jupiter (mag -2.0) will meet Mercury (mag -1.1) in the constellation Taurus. The planets will be clearly visible to the naked eye, but you can also observe them closer with a telescope or a pair of binoculars.

June 6: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on June 6, at 12:38 GMT (8:38 a.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

June 20: June solstice

The June solstice marks the first day of astronomical summer in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of winter in the Southern Hemisphere. In 2024, it will happen on June 20, at 20:51 GMT (4:51 p.m. EDT). It will be the longest day in the Northern Hemisphere; the observers from the Southern Hemisphere, on the contrary, will experience the least amount of sunlight and the shortest day of the year. We prepared a fun and educational quiz about equinoxes and solstices for you. Check if you can tell the difference between these two astronomical events!

Equinoxes & solstices quiz intro#2
Only 10% of people can get the top score in this tricky quiz about equinoxes and solstices!🌝🌏 Test your knowledge and try to join the elite few!
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June 22: Full Moon

The Full Strawberry Moon will occur on June 22, at 01:08 GMT (9:08 p.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Sagittarius. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

June 27: Moon near Saturn, lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Conjunction time: 14:52 GMT (10:52 a.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°06'
  • Close approach time: 14:57 GMT (10:57 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°04'

On June 27, the 72.2%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 1.1). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from eastern Australia, north-eastern New Zealand, Fiji, and New Caledonia will also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

Astronomical events in July 2024

July 1: Moon near Mars

  • Close approach time: 16:19 GMT (12:19 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 3°50'
  • Conjunction time: 18:27 GMT (2:27 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 4°12'

On July 1, the 26.4%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag 1.0). Both objects will be in the constellation Aries. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

July 3: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 07:05 GMT (3:05 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 4°55'

On July 3, the 9.1%-illuminated Moon will be close to Jupiter (mag -2.0). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

July 5: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on July 5, at 22:57 GMT (6:57 p.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

July 15: Mars near Uranus

  • Close approach time: 14:05 GMT (10:05 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°32'

On July 15, Mars (mag 0.9) will meet Uranus (mag 5.8) in the constellation Taurus. You can observe them with a pair of binoculars.

July 21: Full Moon

The Full Buck Moon will occur on July 21, at 10:17 GMT (6:17 a.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Capricornus. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

July 22: Mercury at greatest elongation east

On July 22, at 06:59 GMT (2:59 a.m. EDT), Mercury (mag 0.3) will appear at its farthest apparent distance east from the Sun: the celestial bodies will be separated by 26°54'. The event is called the greatest elongation. It’s the best time to observe Mercury, so don’t miss the chance!

July 24: Moon near Saturn; lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Close approach time: 20:31 GMT (4:31 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°21
  • Conjunction time: 20:38 GMT (4:38 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°24'

On July 24, the 92%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 0.9). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from Asia and Africa will also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

July 30: Moon near Mars

  • Close approach time: 09:01 GMT (5:01 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 4°55'

On July 30, the 29%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag. 0.9). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

July 30: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 22:45 GMT (6:45 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 5°19'

On July 30, the 29%-illuminated Moon will be close to Jupiter (mag -2.1). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

July 31: Southern Delta Aquariid meteor shower peak

The Southern Delta Aquariid (Southern δ-Aquariid) meteor shower will run from July 12 to August 23 and peak around July 31. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Aquarius. The Southern Delta Aquariids are another prolific meteor shower that is best observed from the Southern Hemisphere. In the Northern Hemisphere, the radiant appears lower in the sky; therefore, fewer meteors are visible. The meteors are quite faint and hard to spot under imperfect observation conditions. This year, the Southern Delta Aquariids reach their peak shortly after the Last Quarter Moon, and the radiant is observable until sunrise.

Astronomical events in August 2024

August 4: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on August 4, at 11:13 GMT (7:13 a.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

August 7: Venus near Mercury

  • Conjunction time: 17:23 GMT (1:23 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 5°42'
  • Close approach time: August 8, 03:12 GMT (August 7, 11:12 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 5°46'

On August 7, Venus (mag -3.8) will meet Mercury (mag 1.8) in the constellation Leo. The planets will be clearly visible to the naked eye, but you can also observe them closer with a pair of binoculars.

August 12: Perseid meteor shower peak

The Perseid meteor shower will run from July 17 to August 24 and peak around August 12. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Perseus. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 100 meteors an hour. This year, the First Quarter Moon won’t interfere with observations too much. In the mid-northern latitudes, the radiant will be in the sky all night. Check if you are ready to watch shooting stars by taking our quiz!

Meteor Showers Quiz
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August 14: Jupiter near Mars

  • Close approach time: 15:22 GMT (11:22 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°18'

On August 14, Jupiter (mag -2.2) will meet Mars (mag 0.8) in the constellation Taurus. The planets will be clearly visible to the naked eye, but you can also observe them closer with a telescope or a pair of binoculars.

August 19: Full Moon, Blue Moon, Supermoon

The Full Sturgeon Moon will occur on August 19, at 18:26 GMT (2:26 p.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Aquarius. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

This Full Moon will be the first Supermoon this year. It will appear 6.4% bigger and 12.8% brighter than the average Full Moon.

Also, this Full Moon will be a seasonal Blue Moon, or the third Full Moon in an astronomical season with four Full Moons.

August 21: Moon near Saturn; lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Close approach time: 02:45 GMT (August 20, 11:45 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°25'
  • Conjunction time: 02:54 GMT (August 20, 11:54 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°24'

On August 21, the 98.4%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 0.7). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and Europe will also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

August 27: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 11:50 GMT (7:50 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 5°38'

On August 27, the 43.2%-illuminated Moon will be close to Jupiter (mag -2.3). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

August 28: Moon near Mars

  • Close approach time: 00:00 GMT (August 27, 8:00 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 5°16'

On August 28, the 32.3%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag 0.8). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye.

Astronomical events in September 2024

September 3: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on September 3, at 01:55 GMT (September 2, 9:55 p.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

September 5: Mercury at greatest elongation west

On September 5, at 01:59 GMT (September 4, 9:59 p.m. EDT), Mercury (mag -0.4) will appear at its farthest apparent distance west from the Sun: the celestial bodies will be separated by 18°6'. The event is called the greatest elongation. It’s the best time to observe Mercury, so don’t miss the chance!

September 8: Saturn at opposition

On September 8, at 04:35 GMT (00:35 a.m. EDT), Saturn will reach opposition and shine at its brightest with a magnitude of 0.6. The ringed planet will be located in the constellation Aquarius, looking like a yellowish dot to the naked eye. You’ll see Saturn’s oval shape with a pair of binoculars, but you’ll need a small telescope to see its rings.

September 17: Moon near Saturn; lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Conjunction time: 10:14 GMT (6:14 a.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°18'
  • Close approach time: 10:11 GMT (6:11 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°16'

On September 17, the 96.9%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 0.6). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from the western Contiguous United States, Australia, western Canada, and north-western Mexico will also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

September 18: Full Moon, Supermoon, partial lunar eclipse

The Full Harvest Moon will occur on September 18, at 02:34 GMT (September 17, 10:34 p.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Pisces. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

This Full Moon will be a Supermoon. It will appear 7.8% bigger and 15.6% brighter than the average Full Moon.

Also, on the same day, between 02:12 GMT and 03:15 GMT, the Moon will pass through the Earth’s umbral shadow, creating a partial lunar eclipse. The Moon will be 3.5% in this shadow. The partial lunar eclipse will be visible from Europe, much of Asia, Africa, North America, South America, the Arctic, and Antarctica.

September 21: Neptune at opposition

On September 21, at 00:17 GMT (September 20, 8:17 p.m. EDT), Neptune will reach opposition and shine at its brightest with a magnitude of 7.8. The planet will be in the constellation Pisces. Even at its brightest, Neptune can only be seen with an optical aid, such as binoculars or a telescope.

September 22: September equinox

The September equinox marks the beginning of fall in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring in the Southern Hemisphere. In 2024, the equinox will occur on September 22, at 12:44 GMT (8:44 a.m. EDT). We prepared a fun and educational quiz about equinoxes and solstices for you. Check if you can tell the difference between these two astronomical events!

Equinoxes & solstices quiz intro#2
Only 10% of people can get the top score in this tricky quiz about equinoxes and solstices!🌝🌏 Test your knowledge and try to join the elite few!
Take the quiz!

September 23: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 22:39 GMT (6:39 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 5°49'

On September 23, the 69.8%-illuminated Moon will be close to Jupiter (mag -2.4). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye.

September 25: Moon near Mars

  • Close approach time: 12:40 GMT (8:40 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 4°52'

On September 25, the 47.6%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag 0.5). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

Astronomical events in October 2024

October 2: Annular solar eclipse

On October 2, from 15:44 to 21:46 GMT, observers from Argentina and Chile will see the annular solar eclipse. The Moon will cover the Sun's center, and the observers will see “the ring of fire” around it. Test your knowledge of solar and lunar eclipses with our quiz. Be careful — it’s more difficult than you think!

Man for eclipses quiz
Can solar eclipses be seen from the Moon? When was a solar eclipse first recorded on video? Test your knowledge of solar and lunar eclipses with this quiz.
Take the Quiz!

October 2: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on October 2, at 18:49 GMT (2:49 p.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

October 5: Moon near Venus

  • Conjunction time: 20:26 GMT (4:26 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 3°18'
  • Close approach time: 18:28 GMT (4:28 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 2°49'

On October 5, the 5.9%-illuminated Moon will be close to Venus (mag -3.9). Both objects will be in the constellation Libra. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

October 12: Comet C/2023 A3 reaches its brightest

On October 12, comet C/2023 A3 (Tsuchinshan-ATLAS) will pass close to the Earth (0.48 AU). By that time, it is expected to become visible to the naked eye (its brightness will rise to -0.9). Then the comet will fade rapidly, and by mid-November, it will only be observable through optical devices.

October 14: Moon near Saturn; lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Close approach time: 18:05 GMT (2:05 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 0°06'

On October 14, the 88.3%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 0.7). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from Asia and Africa will also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

October 17: Full Moon, Supermoon

The Full Hunter’s Moon will occur on October 17, at 11:26 GMT (7:26 a.m. EDT). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Pisces. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

This Full Moon will also be the biggest and brightest Supermoon this year. It will appear 7.9% bigger and 15.7% brighter than the average Full Moon.

October 21: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 07:25 GMT (3:25 a.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 5°47'

On October 21, the 84%-illuminated Moon will be close to Jupiter (mag -2.6). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye.

October 23: Moon near Mars

  • Conjunction time: 19:55 GMT (3:55 p.m. EDT)
  • Conjunction distance: 4°12'
  • Close approach time: 21:20 GMT (5:20 p.m. EDT)
  • Close approach distance: 3°49'

On October 23, the 64%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag 0.2). Both objects will be in the constellation Gemini. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

Astronomical events in November 2024

November 1: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on November 1, at 12:47 GMT (8:47 a.m. EDT). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

November 4: Moon near Venus

  • Close approach time: 23:51 GMT (6:51 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 3°05'
  • Conjunction time: November 5, 00:16 GMT (November 4, 8:16 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 3°24'

On November 4, the 7.7%-illuminated Moon will be close to Venus (mag -4.0). Both objects will be in the constellation Ophiuchus. Observe them with the naked eye.

November 11: Moon near Saturn; lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Conjunction time: 01:36 GMT (November 10, 9:36 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°06'

On November 11, the 75.3%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 0.9). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from the Americas will also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

November 15: Full Moon, Supermoon

The Full Beaver Moon will occur on November 15, at 21:29 GMT (4:29 p.m. EST). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Aries. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

This Full Moon will also be a Supermoon. It will appear 6.5% bigger and 12.8% brighter than the average Full Moon.

November 16: Mercury at greatest elongation east

On November 16, at 07:59 GMT (2:59 a.m. EST), Mercury (mag -0.3) will appear at its farthest apparent distance east from the Sun: the celestial bodies will be separated by 22°30'. The event is called the greatest elongation. It’s the best time to observe Mercury, so don’t miss the chance!

November 17: Leonid meteor shower peak

The Leonid meteor shower will run from November 6 to 30 and peak around November 17. Its radiant point is located in the constellation Leo. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 10 meteors an hour. Unfortunately, this year, the shower reaches maximum activity the day after the Full Moon, so the moonlight will likely outshine most meteors.

November 17: Uranus at opposition

On November 17, at 02:45 GMT, Uranus will reach opposition and shine at its brightest with a magnitude of 5.7. The planet will be in the constellation Taurus. Uranus is the farthest planet in the Solar System that can be observed without optics. However, it’s on the edge of naked-eye visibility, so it’s best to use binoculars or a telescope.

November 17: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 14:07 GMT (9:07 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 5°37'

On November 17, the 98.7%-illuminated Moon will be close to Jupiter (mag -2.8). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye.

November 20: Moon near Mars

  • Conjunction time: 21:07 GMT (4:07 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 2°36'
  • Close approach time: 22:15 GMT (5:15 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 2°20'

On November 20, the 79.9%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag -0.3). Both objects will be in the constellation Cancer. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

Astronomical events in December 2024

December 1: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on December 1, at 06:21 GMT (1:21 a.m. EST). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

December 4: Moon near Venus

  • Conjunction time: 22:40 GMT (5:40 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 2°24'
  • Close approach time: 23:34 GMT
  • Close approach distance: 2°12'

On December 4, the 10%-illuminated Moon will be close to Venus (mag -4.2). Both objects will be in the constellation Sagittarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars.

December 7: Jupiter at opposition

On December 7, at 20:58 GMT (3:58 p.m. EST), Jupiter will reach opposition and shine at its brightest with a magnitude of -2.8. The planet will be in the constellation Taurus. Jupiter will become the brightest starlike object after “the morning star” Venus and will be clearly visible to the naked eye, though binoculars or a telescope will provide a more detailed view of the planet and its four largest moons.

December 8: Moon near Saturn; lunar occultation of Saturn

  • Conjunction time: 08:49 GMT (03:49 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 0°18'

On December 8, the 48.4%-illuminated Moon will be close to Saturn (mag 1.0). Both objects will be in the constellation Aquarius. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from eastern Indonesia, Japan, eastern Philippines, and north-western Papua New Guinea will also see the lunar occultation of Saturn.

December 14: Geminid meteor shower peak

The Geminid meteor shower will run from December 4 to 20 and peak around December 14. Its radiant point is located in the constellation Gemini. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 150 meteors an hour. Unfortunately, this year, the shower reaches maximum activity a day before the Full Moon, so the moonlight will likely outshine most meteors.

December 14: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 18:43 GMT (1:43 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 5°26'

On December 14, the 98%-illuminated Moon will be close to Jupiter (mag -2.8). Both objects will be in the constellation Taurus. Observe them with the naked eye.

December 15: Full Moon

The Full Cold Moon will occur on December 15, at 09:02 GMT (4:02 a.m. EST). Our natural satellite will be in the constellation Taurus. Technically, the Full Moon lasts only for a moment when the Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun, but the lunar disk will appear full for one day before and after it.

December 18: Moon near Mars; lunar occultation of Mars

  • Conjunction time: 08:46 GMT (3:46 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 1°00'
  • Close approach time: 09:13 GMT (4:13 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 0°52'

On December 18, the 92.3%-illuminated Moon will be close to Mars (mag -0.9). Both objects will be in the constellation Cancer. Observe them with the naked eye or through a pair of binoculars. Observers from Canada, Greenland, eastern Russia, and Alaska will also see the lunar occultation of Mars.

December 21: December solstice

The December solstice marks the first day of astronomical winter in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of summer in the Southern Hemisphere. In 2024, it will happen on December 21, at 09:20 GMT (4:20 a.m. EST). It will be the shortest day in the Northern Hemisphere; the Southern Hemisphere, on the contrary, will experience the greatest amount of sunlight and the longest day of the year. We prepared a fun and educational quiz about equinoxes and solstices for you. Check if you can tell the difference between these two astronomical events!

Equinoxes & solstices quiz intro#2
Only 10% of people can get the top score in this tricky quiz about equinoxes and solstices!🌝🌏 Test your knowledge and try to join the elite few!
Take the quiz!

December 22: Ursid meteor shower peak

The Ursid meteor shower will run from December 17 to 26 and peak around December 22. Look for its radiant point in the constellation Ursa Minor. Under ideal conditions, you could see up to 10 meteors an hour. This year, the meteor shower peaks around the Last Quarter Moon. Observe the meteor shower after sunset until moonrise. The Ursids will be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere.

December 25: Mercury at greatest western elongation

On December 25, at 01:59 GMT, Mercury (mag -0.4) will appear at its farthest apparent distance west from the Sun: the celestial bodies will be separated by 22°. The event is called the greatest elongation. It’s the best time to observe Mercury, so don’t miss the chance!

December 30: New Moon

The New Moon will occur on December 30, at 22:27 GMT (5:27 p.m. EST). At this point, our natural satellite will stay between the Earth and the Sun, so its bright side will be facing away from the Earth. It’s the best time for stargazing because the Moon’s light won’t hinder the view.

Learn more about the celestial events of 2024

Now you know all the major celestial events in 2024. Get an even more complete calendar in the Sky Tonight app, and follow us on social media to keep up with the latest astronomy news!

Also, see our colorful infographics about Full Moons 2024 and 5 upcoming eclipses, and check more detailed calendars dedicated to specific astronomical events:

5 Upcoming Eclipses Infographics preview
List of 5 upcoming lunar and solar eclipses, their dates, timelines, and visibility maps. Find out whether you can see them from your location!
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