How to See Starlink Satellite Train 2024

~10 min

Calculate when you can see the Starlink satellites in your location — use the Satellite Tracker App! It's specifically designed for tracking satellites like Starlink, ISS, and more. Read on for detailed instructions on how to track Elon Musk's satellites and upcoming Starlink launches!

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For those of you who haven’t heard about Starlink, here’s a quick recap. Starlink is a huge satellite system that aims at providing even the most remote areas of the Earth with high-speed Internet service. It has been developed and constructed by Elon Musk’s company SpaceX since 2015.

The satellites are launched into orbit by batches, each batch containing between 15 and 56 satellites. As of early 2024, there are nearly 6,000 Starlink satellites in orbit. Eventually, SpaceX plans to build a massive constellation of 12,000 satellites, with a possible expansion to 42,000 satellites later on.

Watch the video to see how the number of Starlink satellites in the Earth’s orbit has changed over time.

SpaceX sends a number of satellites on each launch. Traveling at the same altitude and speed, these satellites initially orbit the Earth in a cluster. This is what we see as the "train".

Starlink satellites appear as a "train" of lights for several days after launch. During this time, they're easily visible to the naked eye.

At a certain moment, each satellite ascends into its operational orbit. For observers, it means that they separate from the line. Once they reach this orbit, they become much harder to distinguish in the sky. However, they can still be seen with optics or captured on cameras.

Fun fact: the Starlink satellite "train" is often mistaken for a UFO due to its rather unusual appearance. Check out our useful infographic on other man-made objects that are often mistaken for UFOs.

UFO Infographic: Sky
What are those strange lights in the sky? Uncover the truth behind UFO sightings! 🛸 Explore our infographic to discover how everyday objects can masquerade as mysterious aerial phenomena. 🎆 From colorful lights to spiraling formations, you'll never believe what's really up there!
See Infographic

There have been debates about the potential problems that Starlink satellites can create. Already, there are about 6,000 satellites in the Earth’s orbit. If SpaceX’s plan succeeds, our skies will be swarmed with man-made objects reflecting light. This can hinder the work of professional astronomers whose images of the sky will be contaminated with satellites. Another problem is that so many objects can potentially collide with each other creating space junk.

In response to the first concern, SpaceX has already tested two prototype satellites with darkened surfaces: DarkSat and VisorSat. Now, all the satellites beginning with the Starlink-8 mission have anti-reflective surfaces. As for the second problem, Elon Musk said that the satellites are designed to deorbit within five years in the case of failure.

Starlink satellites offer a spectacular sight – they look like a train of bright spots in the night sky. You can easily see them with the naked eye if you know where and when to look.

Mobile apps are one of the most convenient satellite-tracking tools. They are always at hand, provide real-time information, and offer a range of features that make it easier for users to locate satellites. Many of them can operate without the Internet, which means you can use them anywhere around the globe. Let's see how to find Starlinks via mobile apps.

Satellite Tracker: locate all satellites

The Satellite Tracker app is explicitly designed to locate and identify satellites. Use it to see the satellite’s trajectory on the Earth’s map or the real night sky. The app also shows a 3D model of the satellite in its current position above the Earth. Use the three buttons at the bottom of the main screen to switch between the three display modes.

To find Starlink via Satellite Tracker, tap the satellite icon in the upper right corner of the screen. Choose the “All” tab and scroll down until you find the “SpaceX’s Starlink” section. Then, choose the launch you’re interested in and tap the “Track” button next to one or multiple satellites to add them to your tracking list. Tap on one of the satellites you are interested in to select it and return to the main screen.

How to track Starlinks via Satellite Tracker
Download Satellite Tracker for free and get a powerful tool for spotting satellites in real-time.

To locate the satellite in the sky above you, tap the far right button on the bottom panel of the main screen and follow the white arrow to see where the satellite is right now.

The “Next pass” timer counts the time left until the next flyby of the selected satellite over your location. To set a reminder, tap the timer and the alarm clock button in the drop-down list.

Use Sky Tonight to get free information about the current location of Starlink satellites. The minimalistic design and flexible search system make it easy to use for everyone.

In Sky Tonight, you can find Starlink launch groups — this is much easier for those who want to see the Starlink "train". Tap the magnifier icon and open the search menu. Then, type "Starlink" into the search field and choose the satellite group you want to track. Tap the blue target icon, and the app will show the group’s position on the sky map. Tap the big blue button or point your device up and follow the white arrow to find it in the real sky.

Starlink groups via Sky Tonight
Never miss an upcoming Starlink flyby with Sky Tonight – one of the most convenient tools for finding and tracking celestial objects.

To set reminders for all future visible flyby events, tap the satellite group you want to track in the Search menu. Then go to the Events tab and tap “View all” next to the Visible Passes. You'll then see all the passes for that satellite group that are visible from your location. Tap the bell icon in the top right corner of the screen to set repeated reminders for all these passes.

Set up alerts in Sky Tonight
Use Sky Tonight to set up notifications of upcoming Starlink satellite passes visible from your location.

Watch how to set up reminders for any event in the Sky Tonight app.

Star Walk 2: enjoy beautiful graphic

The Star Walk 2 stargazing app shows the location of various sky objects, including Starlinks. Here, you can also find information about the satellites and their accurate 3D models.

To find Starlink via Star Walk 2, tap the magnifier icon. Then, tap on the satellite icon in the bottom bar of the search panel. Find the latest launched Starlinks at the top of the “Main Satellites” list. To track a specific mission, scroll down to the “SpaceX’s Starlink” section and tap the mission's name to see the satellite list. Tap on a satellite to get accurate information on its position and trajectory.

How to track Starlinks via Star Walk 2
Open Star Walk 2 and enjoy the view of the satellites floating overhead against the backdrop of stylized constellations.

You can use Star Walk 2 to find a chosen satellite in the night sky above you. Follow our tutorial and spot satellites with ease.

Several websites will also help you to view Starlink satellites.

  • On the Heavens-Above website, you can get predictions about Starlinks’ passes in the special section dedicated to these satellites. Select the mission you’re interested in, set the date, and get the information on the next satellites’ pass. Or look for Starlink satellites through the “Satellite Database” section.
  • On the N2YO.com, you can type the name of a Starlink satellite in the search field, and the tool will show you its position and trajectory. Moreover, it will help you track satellites you’re interested in, get 10-day predictions, and complete information about them.
  • On the findstarlink.com website, you can learn when the Starlink satellite trains are expected to be visible at some specific place. Enter the name or coordinates of the desired location to get a list of flybys sorted by visibility. Also, check the Live Map to see satellite trajectories on a world map.

There are many other satellite-tracking websites, so you can always choose the one that suits you best. However, not all of them are mobile-friendly, so check whether the site loads on a smartphone and whether it is convenient for you to use its mobile version. The other downside is that the websites can’t be used without the Internet, so they won't help you if you observe satellites somewhere out of town, away from city lights (and good mobile coverage). So, if you prefer websites, it is better to find out all the information you want about satellite trajectory and flyby time in advance using your PC or laptop.

Keep track of the deployment of the world's largest satellite constellation! Watch for the latest breaking updates, quickly find out how many Starlink satellites are in orbit at the moment, and learn details about recent launches. Track all the launched satellites using the following apps:

On May 28, at 11:30 GMT (May 17, 7:30 a.m. EDT), SpaceX will launch the 169th batch of 23 satellites for the Starlink internet constellation. This mission will boost the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,528 units.

On May 23, at 22:45 GMT (06:45 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 168th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,505 units.

On May 23, at 02:33 GMT (May 22, 10:33 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 167th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,482 units.

On May 18, at 00:32 GMT (May 17, 8:32 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 166th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,459 units.

On May 14, at 18:39 GMT (2:39 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 165th batch of 20 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,436 units.

On May 13, at 00:53 GMT (May 12, 8:53 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 164th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,416 units.

On May 10, at 04:30 GMT (May 9, 12:30 a.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 163rd batch of 20 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,393 units.

On May 8, at 18:42 GMT (May 8, 2:42 a.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 162nd batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,373 units.

On May 6, at 18:14 GMT (2:14 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 161st batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,350 units.

On May 3, at 01:49 GMT (May 2, 09:49 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 160th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,327 units.

On April 28, at 21:50 GMT (05:50 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 159th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,304 units.

On April 23, at 22:17 GMT (6:17 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 158th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,281 units.

On April 18, at 22:40 GMT (6:40 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 157th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,258 units.

On April 17, at 21:26 GMT (5:26 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 156th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,235 units.

On April 13, at 01:00 GMT (April 12, 9:00 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 155th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,212 units.

On April 10, at 04:00 GMT (12:00 a.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 154th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,189 units.

On April 6, at 2:25 GMT (April 5, 10:25 p.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 153rd batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,166 units.

On April 5, at 09:12 GMT (5:12 a.m. EDT), SpaceX launched the 152th batch of 23 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,145 units.

On April 2, at 02:30 GMT (April 1, 22:30 EST), SpaceX launched the 151st batch of 22 Starlink internet satellites. The Falcon 9 rocket lifted off from the Space Launch Complex 4E (SLC-4E) at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California, USA. This mission boosted the total number of Starlink satellites launched to 6,122 units.

You can read about previous Starlink missions in our article.

Starlink satellites are visible from the Earth if you know when to look. They move in a line across the sky like a line or a "train" of bright lights, but the line is only visible for a limited time after the launch. To track the Starlink satellite “train”, it’s better to use a tool that allows you to set up reminders for the visible passes, such as the Sky Tonight or Satellite Tracker mobile apps.

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