Past Moon-Planet Conjunctions 2024

~4 min

From this article, you’ll learn when the planets passed near the Moon in our sky in 2024. For the upcoming conjunctions, read our other monthly-updated article.

Contents

February conjunctions

February 7: Venus near the Moon

  • Conjunction time: 18:52 GMT (1:52 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 5°24'
  • Close approach time: 20:12 GMT (3:12 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 5°22'

On February 7, the 8.1%-illuminated Moon and Venus (mag -3.9) will meet in the constellation Sagittarius. The planet will be visible in the predawn sky next to the thin lunar crescent. It’s best to observe the event with the naked eye.

February 8: Mars near the Moon

  • Conjunction time: 06:30 GMT (1:30 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 4°12'
  • Close approach time: 07:52 GMT (2:52 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 4°07'

On February 8, the 2.8%-illuminated Moon and Mars (mag 1.3) will meet in the constellation Sagittarius. The planet will rise in the morning, about an hour before the Sun. Observe the event with the naked eye or a pair of binoculars.

February 8: Mercury near the Moon

  • Conjunction time: 22:00 GMT (5:00 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 3°12'
  • Close approach time: 23:25 GMT (6:25 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 3°05'

On February 8, the 2.8%-illuminated Moon and Mercury (mag -1.3) will meet in the constellation Capricornus. The planet will rise almost simultaneously with the Sun and will likely be lost in its glare. The Moon will also be barely visible as the event will occur two days before the New Moon.

February 11: Saturn near the Moon

  • Conjunction time: 00:40 GMT (February 10, 7:40 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 1°48'
  • Close approach time: 01:45 GMT (February 10, 8:45 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 1°38'

On February 11, the 5%-illuminated Moon and Saturn (mag 1.0) will meet in the constellation Aquarius. As the event will happen the day after the New Moon, our natural satellite will be unobservable. The ringed planet will be visible in the evening sky for a couple of hours after sunset.

February 12: Lunar occultation of Neptune

  • Occultation start: 05:27 GMT (12:27 a.m. EST)
  • Occultation end: 09:06 GMT (4:06 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach time: 07:11 GMT (2:11 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 0°36'

On February 12, the 11.8%-illuminated Moon will be passing in front of Neptune. The occultation will be visible from Australia, Solomon Islands, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia; the rest of the world will see the planet and the Moon close to each other. Note that Neptune is too faint to be observed without any optics.

February 15: Jupiter near the Moon

  • Close approach time: 06:05 GMT (1:05 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 2°53'
  • Conjunction time: 08:15 GMT (3:15 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 3°12'

On February 15, the 42.5%-illuminated Moon and Jupiter (mag -2.3) will meet in the constellation Aries. You can start observations right after sunset, as both objects will be high in the sky by that time. Both the Moon and the planet will shine bright enough to be seen with the unaided eye.

February 16: Uranus near the Moon

  • Close approach time: 00:27 GMT (February 15, 7:27 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 3°3'

On February 16, the 53.7%-illuminated Moon and Uranus will meet in the constellation Aries. Both objects will rise during the daytime and climb the highest in the sky by sunset. Uranus is rather faint to be observed without any optical aid, so it’s best to bring a pair of binoculars.

January conjunctions

January 8: Moon near Venus

  • Conjunction time: 20:15 GMT (3:15 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 5°42'

On January 8, the Moon and Venus will share the same right ascension. Observe the scene in the early morning, about 2 hours before sunrise. The Moon will be in the constellation Scorpius, and Venus – in the neighboring constellation Ophiuchus.

January 9: Moon near Mercury

  • Conjunction time: 18:49 GMT (1:49 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 6°35'

On January 9, the Moon and Mercury will share the same right ascension. Mercury will rise in the morning, about an hour and a half before the Sun. Both the Moon and the planet will be in the constellation Ophiuchus.

January 10: Moon near Mars

  • Conjunction time: 08:32 GMT (3:32 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 4°09'

On January 10, the Moon and Mars will share the same right ascension. Mars will rise an hour before dawn, and will mostly be in the daytime sky. Both the Moon and the planet will be in the constellation Sagittarius.

January 14: Moon near Saturn

  • Conjunction time: 09:31 GMT (4:31 a.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 4°09'
  • Close approach time: 11:02 GMT (6:02 a.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 1°56'

On January 14, the Moon and Saturn will come the closest to each other in the sky. Saturn will stay in the sky for about 3 hours after sunset. Both the Moon and the planet will be in the constellation Aquarius.

January 15: lunar occultation of Neptune

On January 15, the Moon will be passing in front of Neptune. The occultation will be visible from Saint Helena; the rest of the world will see the planet and the Moon close to each other.

January 18: Moon near Jupiter

  • Close approach time: 18:42 GMT (1:42 p.m. EST)
  • Close approach distance: 2°31'
  • Conjunction time: 20:40 GMT (3:40 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 2°46'

On January 18, the Moon and Jupiter will come the closest to each other in the sky. The bright planet will be visible near the half-lit Moon in the evening. Both the Moon and the planet will be in the constellation Aries.

January 19: Moon near Uranus

  • Conjunction time: 18:11 GMT (1:11 p.m. EST)
  • Conjunction distance: 2°47'

On January 19, the Moon and Uranus will share the same right ascension. The dim planet is hard to spot with the unaided eye; binoculars or a telescope will help to find it in the sky.

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